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How to Make a Thanksgiving Wreath


How To Make Your Very Own Thanksgiving Wreath With Nature

Written by Quest

I don’t know about you, but I love to decorate for every holiday. Especially during pandemic times I am scraping the barrel for things to celebrate. I found myself celebrating holidays that I didn’t even know existed, such as National Ice Cream Sandwich Day (August 2nd…Mark your calendars!).

Luckily, October through January is chock full of reasons to be festive! During unsure times, people are looking towards things that make them happy. I don’t think I am alone when I say that I put my Christmas tree up extra early this year. Although many people are getting a head start on their Christmas cheer, let’s not forget about Thanksgiving. 2020 has been an unforgettable year to say the least (whatever that means to you). Thanksgiving reminds us how important it is for us to recognize what we are grateful for.

With many people celebrating in much smaller groups and oftentimes, away from families, this could be a great opportunity to start your own traditions! One thing that I did this year was make a fall wreath to decorate my front door. What I love most about making wreaths is that everyone can add their own flair and personality to their piece. The other aspect of wreath making that I like, is that I can incorporate things from nature along with other details that mean a lot to me.

Below, I outline some ideas to get your wheels turning to make your very own Thanksgiving wreath! As I mentioned, some of these items can come from your very own backyard. Other components that I mention have meaningful symbolism that you can find at any craft store.

Dried herbs left over from the garden One thing I did this summer to entertain myself through the pandemic was construct my very own garden. I had multiple tomato plants, a flower box, jalapeno plant and an herb box. My herb box in particular was my favorite part of the garden. I was so sad when I saw the herbs start to wither away. I decided to save some of the dried leaves and I was happy to see they still maintained their delicious scent. Adding a few sprigs from your herb garden is a great way to add some greenery and scents to your Thanksgiving wreath.

Rosemary can add beautiful detail to your wreath, however it can also act as the base of the wreath. Check out this awesome example! Rosemary is often representative of loved ones that we have lost. This fragrant herb could act as a great memento for loved ones that have passed.

Sage is another herb that could make a great addition to your wreath. Sage grows like a weed, so you may have plenty left over! This resilient herb is often associated with wisdom. During confusing times, wisdom and light is something we could all benefit from. If you are lucky enough to have it growing in your backyard, Russian sage thrives in Colorado’s dry climate and is a beautiful lavender color- sure to make your wreath pop with color!

Chamomile is often used in tea, however not all chamomile is created equally. I was pleasantly surprised when I saw these mini-daisies growing in my flower bed, however after doing some research I learned that the chamomile that grows in Colorado is referred to as Scentless Chamomile and is not used medicinally. It’s considered a weed in higher elevations, however I find these delicate beauties to be pretty. During the spring and summer time, it is not uncommon to see this growing abundantly in prairie fields. These long stems are perfect for braiding or wrapping around your wreath. The daisy like flowers are dainty but can add a sweet touch to your creation. Chamomile symbolizes fulfilled dreams, humility and rest.

Dried cranberries can be a great contribution to your wreath, especially if you are a native of tates where cranberry bogs are common. Wisconsin, Massachusetts, New Jersey and Washington are a few of the states where cranberries flourish. Making cranberry garland to string around your wreath or just adding bunches is an excellent way to incorporate your roots into your thanksgiving wreath.

Pinecones One of my favorite things about hiking is looking for the perfect pinecone. Whether you are more inclined to pick the most intact pinecone or a pinecone with character and imperfections, there is no shortage of them in Colorado. Pine trees are one of the most ancient plants on our planet and symbolize enlightenment. Pinecones can add a hint of fragrance to your wreath, but if you want a stronger scent add a dash of pine and cinnamon essential oil to them! If you want to add a little more flair to your wreath, you could always spray paint them or add a snowy effect to them.

A symbol from your homeland Living in Colorado, I have learned that natives are hard to come by. It seems that 8 out 10 people that I talk to are transplants from another state. During the holidays, many of us find ourselves reflecting on where we came from. Adding things that represent your home state can be a nice addition to your wreath. Below are some ideas: Citrus slices, although not native to Colorado, make a gorgeous addition to a wreath or centerpieces. If you are originally from the coast, this could be a sweet and fragrant addition to your thanksgiving wreath. I grew up in the Midwest, but I love these colorful slices. You could use oranges, limes, grapefruits or lemons as a way to add a splash of color to your holiday creation. I may even snag this idea to decorate my Christmas tree. Here is a great tutorial on how you can create these citrus additions.

Dried cranberries can be a great contribution to your wreath, especially if you are a native of the states where cranberry bogs are common. Wisconsin, Massachusetts, New Jersey and Washington are a few of the states where cranberries flourish. Making cranberry garland to string around your wreath or just adding bunches is an excellent way to incorporate your roots into your thanksgiving wreath.


Cotton tufts and seashells are representations of the southern states and can be eye-catching additions to your wreath. People from the south where cotton is common will find a piece of home by adding these elements to their wreaths. Cotton symbolizes wealth and prosperity which adds another layer of meaning to your piece. For those that grew up as beach dwellers can agree that seashells make beautiful decorations on any wreath. Since we don’t have many places to harvest seashells in Colorado, craft stores can supply you with your seashell needs!

Flint corn is a great representation of the Midwest and being from Illinois, naturally it is my favorite component of any holiday wreath. As a kid, I would walk through corn fields looking for the multi colored cobs to add to my collection. After doing some research, I learned that corn symbolizes rebirth. 2020 has provided a lot of challenges so this idea of rebirth is an appealing element to add to any wreath. Take a look at how I incorporated flint corn into my own holiday wreath!

The holidays this year will be different than years before, but that doesn’t mean we can’t still enjoy the holidays. Plan a virtual zoom party with your friends and family and make a fall wreath together! This could be one of many new traditions that you can start this holiday season. Make sure to customize it to fit your personality! After my friends and I made our wreaths, I showed the collection to my Dad and best friend and they were both able to guess which one was mine! It is funny how our identity comes through in our creations. Make your own creation and be sure to tag PPACstudio. We would love to see what you come up with.

Pikes Peak Artist Collective wishes you a happy and safe Thanksgiving!

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